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Top six trends that are shaping the future of television

Top six trends that are shaping the future of television

We don’t know how, when and why Television has always been called an Idiot Box world over. On the contrary, it is a smart device which has encapsulated our attention unabashedly over the longest period of time since its inception and the first television service by British Broadcasting Corporation in 1936. Today, even after 80 years, it rules our heart and is still a major source of entertainment and global information.

The television industry in the last few decades has grown extensively and the wave continues. Whether in terms of technology, state-of-the-art looks or content, many key players in a highly competitive market keep up with the pace of development. Advancements in terms of knowledge, exposure, urbanization, increased buying power and a continuous shift in user preferences keep the innovators on their toes to think beyond the edge.

In terms of technology, the end users might think that now the peak has arrived, and there is nothing more that innovators can come up with. But we also agree with the mystic power of human brain who, if one can anticipate the current trends, is surely preparing for something which will take television technology to an altogether another level of viewing.

Some of the trends that are shaping the future of Television include:

  1. Holographic TV

BBC has always been a front-runner as far as anything concerned with TV goes. It has trialed for a technology and content wherein a fairly big size TV is laid flat and simple, old Victorian theatre techniques are used to create 3D images which seem to float in the air.1

Though a Holographic TV is still at its nascent stage the initiation is applaudable.

  1. Data Analytics

The revolution, “Big Data Analytics” aids smart viewership. Early adopters like Netflix have used it extensively to create a niche and specialize in the domain as creative as content production. We hope to see it being widely adopted, more hands-on to optimize produced or acquired content. The steps are simple; behavioral data is collected from various sources, classified and judged to help identify end-user preferences.

  1. Virtual Reality

In terms of technology, Virtual Reality predictably is the next big thing which aims at completely revolutionizing the concept of TV watching. It’s an ever-growing popular culture wherein a consumer after wearing a VR headset can explore virtual, computer-generated worlds. It replicates an environment and simulates user’s real-time presence and allows full interaction. VR, when integrated with TV shows can help a user be a part of that show. Looks a bit far-fetched at the moment, but not too far also. In fact, Director Steven Soderbergh’s new ambitious project Mosaic, an interactive narrative app is a perfect example of this concoction. It is due to release soon where the audience becomes a part of the narration and gets the leverage to decide how the story should unfold. It’s a new way of storytelling and irrespective of its response and real-time success paves way for more such experiments.2

  1. Virtualization

Virtualization creates an ecosystem where independent services can share a common platform. It will surely take some time to realize this completely but cloud-based broadcasting wherein the content is put on public clouds for smooth broadcasting and viewing experience, is fast catching up. In fact, coming years will see major investments in cloud solutions. It does away with huge hardware investments and their maintenance and broadcasters benefit in terms of scalability and high levels of efficiency. They are extremely cost-effective with reduced turnaround time and helps manage viewer demands to a large extent. Predictably, a cloud utility model is surely going to turn Broadcasters into Orchestrators whose job would be to deliver aggregated content. The transition is already on its way. Key players like BBC, Disney/ABC Television have started making the shift as the world moves towards Virtualization. 3

  1. Immersive and Interactive Experience-Augmented Reality

Technologists have always aimed for maximum consumer participation. Tools are being developed to involve our sensory powers to blur the line between the real and digital world thereby making the viewer part of the content. A mid-world is created where 3D and 4D images give the brain a real-time perception and the user feels more involved. 3D audio effects surround sound helps manipulate a sound one hears and provides a more real-time effect. One can easily confuse this with Virtual Reality but Augmented Reality deals more with the real world. It enhances the experience by adding drama to it. And Broadcasters are making hands-on use of it by developing more interactive and engaging shows with maximum audience participation.

Plans to introduce Interactive Advertising by Channel 4 on British TV is one step forward to it where watchers would enjoy the liberty to choose different ads, watch different content or even buy the products instantly.4

  1. Humanoids, AI comes to Television Broadcasting

Robots have always fascinated us since time immemorial. Recently, a real-time robot or a Humanoid, Sophia surfaced on BBC television featuring as a spokesperson on BBC’s Earth TV. It is made of frubber (flesh rubber) and is highly sophisticated. It has a human face and also emulates real-time human emotions. It is not functioning in artificial intelligence. Rather it has scripted answers. One can only anticipate the whole experience of television watching in the future with more such humanoid interactions. 5

On the Whole

Above are some of the trends observed that are going to shape the future of TV. And it doesn’t stop here. The list is ever growing. Technologists and innovators are constantly aiming for utmost consumer participation and keep them more involved and engaged. Broadcasters are trying really hard to absorb new technologies and amalgamating them to give their audiences different forms of experiences thereby entertaining them. The game is actually to play with the human mind and show them something which ups their curiosity level. It is a new age fairy tale times which is illusionary and beautiful and forces one to be a part of those moments.

Cultural institutions preserving heritage in digitization era

Cultural institutions preserving heritage in digitization era

Culture forms the backbone of each place and its people are identified by their cultural uniqueness. Some great thinkers started preserving it over the time to keep it alive even after thousands and thousands of years.

Today, each country or community has so much heritage of such great value, it is unimaginable. There is audiovisual history, artifacts, material objects, paper preserves, books and the list of items goes on. This heritage is only adding up with each passing day. Museums, libraries, galleries, cultural institutions are full of priceless content.

When it all started off, no one must have ever thought of the challenges humankind will face to take care of them and keep them alive for generations and generations to come. But slowly and gradually, these institutions started facing issues as far as the quality of these preserves was concerned. With changing times and depleting environmental conditions, it became very difficult to upkeep with the quality of each heritage. The need to secure these valuables became such a worrisome issue and needed a permanent and a highly durable solution to it.

WORLD OF DIGITIZATION AND ITS CHALLENGES

A lot of research went into it and Digitization provided the one-stop solution to all problems these institutions were facing. It brought new life to the ever-diminishing rich cultural heritage of our very existence. But it was just a start. With the onset of digitization journey, cropped up, many challenges.

What to Digitize & How to Store

Not everything could be digitized or preserved. There were various forms in which our history existed and that too in varied conditions. Selecting a thing which was possible to revive and then deciding on how to preserve it became the first and foremost task of digitization specialists. The content had to be selective, holds significance with the motive of preservation and be in a revival condition.

Another concern for the custodians of these historical assets is storing the items once a digital copy has been created. It is a speculated decision of investing resources to store old physical items, such as obsolete audio-video material, or frail paper items or let them go after they have been archived digitally.

The Copyright Issue

Another major issue which affected many digitization projects was The Copyright Issue which had to go through a lot of clearances. In such cases, there was the high risk of content being frail or sub judice. Google Books Library Project is a well-known example for when it started digitizing books of US libraries in 2002, never had they thought what lay ahead. In 2005, members of Association of American Publishers and Authors’ Guild brought proceedings of copyright infringement against Google. It was only after a long battle that in late 2013, Google’s activities were protected as fair use.

Money Matters

Cost is another major issue. Any digitization project – audio, video, or manuscript etc. – involves a huge investment in terms of technology and highly skilled manpower. A fair amount of budget needs to be allocated which depends largely on the content, in its present analog form and how will it be converted digitally. Initially, the main purpose to digitize content was to create a repository. Further commercial use was not something high on agenda. But, over the period of time, its future viability became a major deciding factor before undertaking any project.

SOME OF THE SUCCESSFUL DIGITIZATION PROJECTS

Overcoming all hindrances and obstacles, many digitization projects were undertaken and accomplished the feat.

To name a few, The Star East Asian Library at Columbia University holds a unique collection of over 200 Chinese “paper gods” which were conserved and digitized.

Digitizing history of Australian Museum and South Australian Museum in 2010 is another example wherein digitizing workstations were built to reduce cost and increase productivity. They also enjoyed the luxury of increased budgets from time to time seeing the outcome.

In 2015, a major digitization project was undertaken by University of Michigan Biological Collections to digitize close to 50,000 natural history specimens.

Many libraries namely Library of Congress, The British Library, Australian Islamic Library, South Carolina State Library, German National Library of Medicine, National Library of Indonesia, National Library of Whales are few of the names who have successfully preserved their rich heritage. Furthermore, world-class universities also went the digital way to not only preserve their assets but also made them available for references.

THE IMPACT & ROAD AHEAD

Consistent and sustainable efforts showed positive results and slowly and gradually, all institutions started adopting digitization or digital archiving to save and preserve their assets. Now, it has become a worldwide phenomenon and every place, big or small, has adopted technology to give a new life to their collection.

It is even envisaged that in years to come, the word ‘Digital’ would have no meaning of its own. It would actually mean ‘Default’. Digital libraries and repositories have helped our cultural organizations in not only preserving the vast history but has also aided in its accessibility to a wider audience thus by satisfying its commercial viability as well.

Digitization seems to be the need of present and future to preserve our glory and pass it on to our coming generations for them to understand their roots, their forefathers’ journey of life and evolvement of the human brain. It helps in beautifully integrating the past into the present and together advance towards the future.

Women Who Changed the Face of Broadcast Industry

Women Who Changed the Face of Broadcast Industry

Women across the world are breaking glass ceilings. This Women’s Day, we bring you five such women of India and the Middle East who have made contribution in changing the face of broadcast industry.

1. Homai Vyarawalla – India’s First Woman Photojournalist

Born in Gujarat, India in 1913, Homai Vyarawalla (popularly known as ‘Dalda 13’) was India’s first female photojournalist. She started her career in the 1930s and was noticed nationally when she moved to Mumbai in 1942. Over the next 30 years, Vyarawalla worked as a press photographer, capturing the last days of the British Empire and many national leaders, including Gandhi, Nehru, Jinnah, and Indira Gandhi.

Vyarawalla was one of the key visual chroniclers of the post-independence era, tracing the euphoria and disillusionments of a new nation. During World War II, she worked with The Illustrated Weekly of India magazine, which published many of her iconic black and white images. Vyarawalla was awarded Padma Vibhushan in 2011, which is the second highest civilian award of the Republic of India.

2. R. Vijayalakshmi – Asia’s First Woman Cinematographer

Daughter of the legendary actor, director, and producer B.R. Panthulu. B.R. Vijayalakshmi, who started her career as an assistant to cinematographer Ashok Kumar, is Asia’s first woman cinematographer. She made her feature film debut with the Tamil film ‘Chinna Veeduin’ in 1985.

After working in over 22 films, Vijayalakshmi took a break from the cinema after the birth of her son, only to return as a known face in television. “Paatu Padavaa” – the last film scripted, directed and cinematographed by Vijayalakshmi in 1995 made it to the International Film Festival of India 1996.

3. Hessa Al Ossaily – Mother of UAE Media

Hessa Al Ossaily, born in Sharjah in 1950, is the first TV announcer of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and has donned many hats as a female pioneer in the broadcasting industry. She was Director of the Ministry of Information and Culture’s Exhibition Department for more than 30 years and is now one of the UAE’s most successful businesswomen.

In 1965, at the age of 15, Al Ossaily became the first Emirati woman to become a presenter at Sawt Al Sahil Radio, which was launched in Sharjah by the British. In 1969, after graduating from Ain Shams University in Egypt, she joined Kuwaiti TV as a presenter.

Known as the Mother of UAE Media, Al Ossaily was assigned general commissioner for the UAE’s involvement in expos in 1992. In 2000, she became the first Arab female member of the country’s steering committee for that year’s expo in Hanover, Germany.

4. Nayla Al Khaja – UAE’s First Woman Filmmaker

Dubbed UAE’s first female filmmaker, Nayla Al Khaja graduated from Dubai Women’s College with a degree in Mass Communication in 1999 and hosted her travel show with Arabian Radio Network. In 2005, she graduated in Image Studies – Film from Ryerson University in Canada, a college well-known for its film-making programs.

Soon after graduation, Nayla founded a full-service production company ‘D-SEVEN Motion Pictures,’ which specialized in the production corporate videos, documentaries, short films, and TV commercials. The production house had an impressive list of clientele, which includes industry giants like Vogue, BMW, Gucci, Mercedes, Nike, Cannon, Nivea, LG, and Discovery Studios to name a few.

In 2006, Nayla made her first short film “Arabana”- which dealt with the subject of child abuse. The film premiered at the Dubai International Film Festival in 2007 where she won the title for ‘Best Emirati Filmmaker.’

5. Alia Al Shamsi – UAE’s First Professional Female Photographer

Born and raised in Dubai from an Italian mother and a UAE father, Alia Al Shamshi studied photography, and photojournalism in Australia and is a full-time photojournalist for El Emarat El Youm and Emirates – two newspapers of Dubai. She is also working as curator, photographer, and archivist on many independent projects and has been involved with food and fashion photography. Her photographs featured in international magazines like National Geographic and are exhibited in many countries, including USA, Australia, Germany, Italy, and UAE.

We wish more power to women of today! Happy International Women’s Day!

The Rise of Flying Machines: How Drones Are Transforming Broadcast and Media Production 

The Rise of Flying Machines: How Drones Are Transforming Broadcast and Media Production 

If you have watched Planet Earth II (broadcasted in 2016), a follow-up to the nature series aired in 2006 on BBC – the intimate close-ups, chases and kills, and the sweeping vistas might have left you spellbound. While the voice of Sir David Attenborough still gave us goose bumps, the sights added on to the experience – making us feel right in the middle of the action.

If you’re wondering the technology behind this transformation over a decade, read on!

Cinematographers have used the latest in camera technology to create the experience. Drones! To capture those stunning panoramas and actions, drones created the magic that you witness sitting in your living room.

If you watch television with a trained eye, you’ll notice that many series, documentaries, and movies are shot using drones to provide a real-life experience to the viewers. Movies like the Expendables 3, Transformers: Age of Extinction, The Wolf of Wall Street, and Captain America are shot using drones.

Drones are becoming popular among production companies for filming shots that require adrenalin-filled action sequences, literal birds’ eye views, dramatic panoramas or 360-degree views of subjects. In fact, 2015 witnessed the birth of the New York City Drone Film Festival, the world’s first drone film festival to recognize the remarkable usage of drone in cinematography where at least 50% of the footage is shot using a drone.

Ben Sheppard, managing director of Spider Aerial Filming, sums up the advantages of drones over static cranes and expensive helicopters. “No other filming method can start a sequence inside a building and end up at 400 feet altitude in one uncut shot,” says Sheppard. Not only does drones allow the reader to build a better mental picture of the layout of the land, but it can also get down to ground level, with smaller shadows and less air disturbance, unlike helicopters.

Media and broadcast industry, particularly journalism and documentaries witnessed a revolution in 2016 as a result of the increasing capabilities of drones. After the popularity of the New York Times story on the impact of the Syrian Civil War on Aleppo that was captured using drone footage, the newspaper published a list of top stories it covered through drone footage.

CNN uses drones to augment its traditional television coverage and provide improved vantage point. The news network has also launched a team to fly and operate drones as part of expanded news coverage to provide the benefits of planes and helicopters for a fraction of the cost.

“A news story about immigration comes alive to the viewer’s when sweeping shots are taken of the presenter over the white cliffs of Dover. Or a drone flying above a car racing down a mountain road adds to the excitement when the surrounding terrain is visible,” says Sandra Hossack, Director at SkyPower – a supplier of aerial filming platforms.

As the technology matures, using drones has its set of challenges. As the US formulates the framework for legitimizing usage of drones, regulatory barriers still prevent drone adoption. Companies need permission from the Civil Aviation Authority to work with them. For example, in August 2014, during the civil unrest Ferguson, Missouri, police requested the airspace to be closed to prevent media from gathering footage. The authorities also instituted no-fly zones at Standing Rock, North Dakota in 2016 to prevent coverage of the protests and the acts of police.

Using drones is already transforming the media. It will only increase as drones become more technically able and widespread. Drone manufacturers are developing technologies like collision avoidance and geo-fencing to make flying drones safer.

A BI Intelligence report predicts drone sales to go up to $12 billion in 2021[1], from just over $8 billion in 2016. As authorities create regulations to permit more widespread use of drones, this trend will only increase moving forward. Drones are not just toys, but a part of the new media wave.

[1] http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-how-drones-are-transforming-news-media-2017-1?IR=T

Top 6 Media Asset Management Flubs Broadcasters Must Avoid

Top 6 Media Asset Management Flubs Broadcasters Must Avoid

Media Asset Management (MAM) comes with its own set of perils. If managed properly, media can attract huge views and TRPs. However, if mismanaged, it leads to waste of money and sometimes, loss of valuable media assets.

To help you deal with your media assets like a pro, we bring you six flubs that broadcasters must avoid.

  1. Aged and Untreated Content

A lot of content from yesteryear still lies in old format, like films, audio reels, and video tapes. While the world has moved ahead to consume media over internet, a lot of such valuable content still lies untreated. Additionally, content that has made its way to the new format are often not processed well and is of poor quality.

As the millennials consume content in different formats across different mediums as per their convenience, it is important to ensure that content of the yesteryear are treated and converted properly for their consumption. Content owners need to address the damages caused by natural disasters and factors like humidity, heat, etc. and have a defined quality check process in store. Moreover, they need to assess the assets to determine the best way to convert the untreated content and find an appropriate platform to store, access, and distribute the content.

  1. Not Considering Multiple Channels for Broadcast

If you look around, content is no longer limited to a particular channel. Movies that were once limited to theaters are now available online in the form of short films, daily soaps have made way for internet-series, and mobile apps offering live news updates  have replaced 9 o’ clock news.

While producers mark their success by the new content created, they often overlook the fact that the same content can be used across different channels to increase its usability. Content curators need to restore the old content in various formats to ensure it can be consumed by a wide range of audience.

  1. Not Choosing the Right Storage Solution

While having good content is important, storing it using the right medium is equally important to ensure that it is easily accessible. Depending on a number of factors like, how geographically distributed are the users; rights and governance; network infrastructure and connectivity; scalability of content users, a robust storage solution should be chosen.

IT managers need to understand that a single storage options will not cater to all kinds of content. For some, Linear Tape-Open (LTO) and Networked Attached Storage (NAS) might be ideal, while for others cloud will fit the bill. To ensure seamless access of content, the asset management team needs to explore different storage options and, at times, store and distribute the same content using multiple solutions.

  1. Discounting Metadata

“My content is not searchable” is a common complaint by the users. As content library grows, managing the content and ensuring it is searchable is a big task. With time, users do not have idea of where content is kept and even duplicate existing content often.

While search feature in modern MAM solutions are powerful, they can’t offer the desired results without proper metadata and indexing.  It has been observed that despite having the best MAM solution in place, the users often discount metadata, which makes discovering, sharing and distribution of media difficult for the users. To ensure the content is usable, new media files must be tagged, old must be versioned and re-tagged if required,   and operators must follow strict quality checks while ingesting the files in a MAM solution.

  1. Ignoring the Workflow

Choosing a MAM solution without assessing the existing workflow can pose major challenges for any broadcaster or a media organization. To get the best out of a MAM solution, it must seamlessly integrate with other systems like production automation, newsroom automation, editing suites, traffic billing system etc.  For providing a smooth content distribution across the organization, some level of customization might be required for a tightly packed integration between various modules. IT managers must meticulously examine the workflow and then recommend the right MAM solution.

  1. Wrong Choice of Partner

More often than not, organization partner with a vendor to manage their media asset. Choosing a vendor who does not have the expertise to manage your media can wreak havoc.

If you have chosen a specific MAM solution, ensure that the partner you choose to implement has expertise in the specific tool and more importantly, they understand the technical workflow of a broadcaster. Check references and prior experience to ensure the partner you chose know the system and are able to implement it.

The Tube Goes Personal- My Television, My Time, My Way

The Tube Goes Personal- My Television, My Time, My Way

The Tube Goes Personal

It was just another lazy Saturday noon at 41, Manchester lane for the Smiths. Everyone in the family was busy with their routine weekend affairs. Jenny was busy with her preparations for the dinner they were hosting for their family friends and was hoping to get a helping hand from her teenage kids Amber and Alex. She exclaimed looking at her teenage son, Alex “God knows what these kids to up to! They are always hooked to their mobile phones and iPads.”  It was half past seven and Alex was still completely engrossed in his tablet, watching something with rapt attention. Out of sheer curiosity and a bit of anger, Jenny took a peak into Alex’s screen trying to figure what he was glued to.

What Alex shared was a revelation for his mother. He explained how he can catch up on his favorite TV series on his smart phone or a tablet as and when he gets time. The very thought of watching her favorite shows without having to fight for the remote made Jenny smile, and she was super excited to learn that she can enjoy all of her sops simply by downloading an app on her mobile.

A global research suggests that an adult-internet user spends almost 20 hours per week online – consuming media. Interestingly, for the first time ever, Britons will spend around GBP 1.31 billion on video streaming subscriptions and film/TV downloads in 2016, more than on buying and renting DVDs.

My Television, My Way:  Happy Viewers

Television has been constantly reinventing itself and today, it has transformed itself from an idiot box to a smart device offering a personalized experience.  There were times when watching television was a family affair but with growing options, reach and changing preferences, there is a major change in content consumption patterns. While the previous generations fret over missing an episode, the modern viewer is consuming content in a whole new way.

OTT services providers like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon , beIN Connect etc. are now offering subscription based services to consumers on one end and are investing on sourcing content. Netflix has even taken a step forward by entering into production of content.

Cord cutting (the term used for viewers cancelling their television subscription services for alternate content sources) is now catching up with millennials around the world. As a viewer, on-demand TV gives them a choice to watch the content they like anytime, anywhere and on any device.

Getting Heard:  A Marketer’s Delight    

OTT, SVOD, Mobile TV are a fantastic medium for marketers to reach out their audience. Not only does it offer targeted advertising options but it offers meaningful insights for marketers to analyze and optimize their campaigns.  The result is impactful campaigns, reduced media spill and improved ROI.

Feed the Appetite: Content for the Consumers

With this trend shift, the industry is more focused on creating content to cater to the diverse set of viewers. While creating new content is important, re-purposing old content to make it accessible is also equally important. Digitization and management of old content in various formats is necessary for the survival of the heritage. Because, the new generation may not have read the works of Jane Austen, but chances are they would not have missed ‘Emma Approved’, the web-series based on her popular novel Emma.

Audiovisual Content Monetization: How Ready Are You?

Audiovisual Content Monetization: How Ready Are You?

Television is no more the only go-to entertainment device. According to a report[1], as viewers consume TV shows and movies in various devices on-the-go, television has lost 13 percent of its viewers in 2015.

With the millennials abandoning television faster than anybody else, broadcasters are aggressively exploring new ways to package content and share it across multiple platforms. Consumers now want more variety and quality content to be delivered to the right device at the right price, which is why providers are looking beyond repackaging the same old content to make it available.

As content becomes the leading online commodity, broadcasters and media organizations are trying to monetize their content. The need to create, convert, and manage digital content has brought forth new technologies, competitive paradigms, and business dynamics in the industry.

Consumers now expect instant access of all content – news, entertainment, corporate, social, media or personal across devices. This has resulted in companies innovating to create ways to monetize content. The biggest challenge that organizations are facing is not technology but availability of content in the consumable format. If monetization is the immediate priority, content owners need to focus on:

  1. Digitization of their historic analog content
  2. Management and optimization of newly produced content

A lot of content still lies in old format like video tapes or film. Organizations need to convert these to digital files and create relevant metadata and support index to aid effective and seamless content retrieval. To facilitate this, content curators need to assess the audio-visual assets to determine the appropriate platform to store, access and distribute the content. Moreover, content, as an asset, needs to be managed well to ensure optimal distribution across channels to generate parallel revenue streams.

Once digitized and managed well, media asset managers not only undertake the effort to digitize and manage content to ensure easy search and availability, they also present an array of options to monetize the content.

Subscription Plan

Common for all types of digital content, be it gaming, streaming content (like Hulu, Spotify, or Netflix), software, or magazine and newspapers, subscription model primarily use paywalls, through which users subscribe to content for a monthly or annual fee. Broadcasters have the option of implementing paywall after a free trial, immediately on consuming the content, or pay-as-per-use. Some content are also charged after a specific number of views, which allows broadcasters to generate revenue from ad.

Transaction Plan

Consumers have access to digital content after paying one-time transaction fee, where they pay-to-own the track, movie, image, or article, or pay multiple times as they use the content. Multiple transactions allow users to have time limited access of content and applications. iTunes and YouTube movies are examples of content being available in this model.

Freemium Plan

Under this plan, content is offered for free, while the broadcasters charge premium for selective content. For example, Angry Birds game is available for free, but users need to pay for an ad-free version or to purchase goods and levels within the game.

Ad-support Plan

Common across digital verticals, ad-supported free content earns revenue from ads, like banner or C. While content is provided free, advertisers use the platform to run ad campaigns and pays the content owner for using the platform.

While organizations try different plans across different platforms to broadcast and monetize content, what needs to be kept in mind is one-size-fits-all doesn’t work for all content owners. Media asset managers and broadcasters need to identify the ideal plan that suits the overall business objectives of the organization.

[1] https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-digital-video-connected-consumer

Forget Samba and the Carnival, Rio Olympics 2016 is here to Enthrall You

Forget Samba and the Carnival, Rio Olympics 2016 is here to Enthrall You

“Brazil, where hearts were entertaining June
We stood beneath an amber moon
And softly murmured “someday soon”

From Frank Sinatra to Vengaboys, Brazil caught the attention of many. And not without any reason. The largest Latin American economy, Brazil is known for its rich and vibrant culture. From hosting colorful carnival that caught the world in frenzy to Samba and football fever, the country has always been a happening city.

Adding to the fervor, this year, Brazil is hosting the 31st Summer Olympics at Rio from August 5 – 21, 2016. The Games, which witnessed the latest broadcast technologies being introduced over the years, is set to witness some major shift in the broadcasting technology landscape. The launch of the Olympic Channel by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) is the beginning of the revolution that the industry will see this year. According to Thomas Bach, the President of IOC, the channel aims to attract young people. He further adds that the Committee is leaving no stones unturned to retain the relevance of sports and to root the athletes in the young target group.

If this got you excited, hold on! We have got a list of the new broadcasting technologies that would make the sports lover in you jump with joy. For this year, to provide a never before experience to the sports enthusiasts, the Olympics broadcasters are introducing a host of new technologies.

Virtual Reality (VR)

With Facebook devoting resources to fine-tune the viewers’ experience of virtual reality, you know it already that virtual reality is in focus. However, for the first time in the history of Olympics, sports enthusiasts will be able to enjoy the Games in high-definition Virtual Reality (VR).

Not long ago, broadcasters experimented with 180-degree VR experience at the Lillehammer 2016 Winter Youth Olympic Games. Now, at Rio Olympics, they will take it a step ahead and provide a unique viewing experience. Viewers will be able to experience the action in the field, including one key event per day and the Opening and Closing Ceremonies live through VR technologies. All they need is a compatible headset.

And if you miss the action live, highlights of 360-degree-video content will be available as Video on Demand (VOD).

8K Super High Vision Broadcasting

4K TVs are passé. In 2016, experience Olympics in 8K Super High Vision (SHV) resolution (7,680 x 4,320 pixels) with an immersive 3-D 22.2 multichannel audio surround system. The Olympic Broadcasting Services (OBS) is partnering with Japanese broadcaster to provide 130 hours of live coverage of select Olympic events in 8K SHV.

Wide Color Gamut / High Dynamic Range

Rio 2016 will also witness OBS experimenting with a new technology – Wide Color Gamut/ High Dynamic Range (WCG/ HDR) that displays a wider range of colors that are more natural and true-to-life.

Olympic Video Player (OVP)

There is a significant change in the behavioral pattern of the viewers. They now consume content across multiple devices, anytime, anywhere. In Sochi Winter Olympic Games 2014, the sports broadcasters’ experienced it for the first time, with digital coverage far exceeding linear TV coverage.

Addressing the need, the OBS will offer Olympic Video Player (OVP) for Rio 2016. The advanced multi-platform video player will complement the enjoyment of the Olympic viewing experience, with access to more content and data.

With these new technologies, get ready to be enthralled in August as you experience Olympics like real-life sitting miles away. Cheering for your favorite sportsperson will be more lifelike now!