Digitization Of Audio Video Content For Long Term Preservation

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Digitization Of Audio Video Content For Long Term Preservation

The challenges of long-term preservation of digital information have been discerned by the archival community for years. In December 1994, the Research Libraries Group (RLG) and the Commission on Preservation and Access (CPA) formed a Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information with the main aim of investigating what needed to be sufficed to assure long-term preservation and continued access to the digital books. The final report issued by the Task Force (Garrett, J. And Waters, D., Ed. (1996). “Preserving digital information: Statement of the task force on archiving of digital audio and video data. Became a fundamental document in the area of digital preservation that helped put out key concepts, requirements, and challenges.

The Task Force proposed development of a national scheme of digital archives that would claim responsibility for long-term memory and access to digital information; introduced in the concept of trusted digital repositories and define their purposes and responsibilities; identified five characteristics of digital data integrity (content, fixity, reference, provenance, and context) that were later included into a classification of Preservation Description Information in the Open Archival Information System Reference Model;  and clear migration as a crucial function of digital files. The concepts and recommendations outlined in the report laid a basis for subsequent inquiry and digital preservation initiatives.

What’s the top digital video file system for preservation?” Finding correct digital preservation file formats for audiovisual contents is not an easy job.  While a lot of the recorded audio preservation realm has agreed upon the viability of the Broadcast Wave file format for sound materials, the video realm is still sort of the Wild West in that there is no wide consensus regarding what types of file formats or codec’s are suitable for preservation. Many establishments use the AVI container with uncompressed video bit streams as masters. Even so some institutions prefer QuickTime wrappers for their uncompressed video masters.

Preferably, the preservation professional must ask a series of inquiries about the workflow, size and substance of their peculiar creation. In that respect is as well the matter of sustainability when choosing digital formats. To avail the user define the sustainability of a digital format, the Library has created an online resource called the Sustainability of Digital Formats website : http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/.

This web resource lists hundreds of digital formats and puts on a rubric to each in order to help the digital preservation professional determine if the format would be likely to be viable long term. This title contains “sustainability factors” such as adoption (how many widespread is the exercise of this format?), simplicity (“can we easily see under the cowl of this format?”), external dependencies (“what hardware, operating systems and/or software do we need to access this format?”) and so on. Sustainability, along with an institution’s workflow and infrastructure, should be looked at when creating the most appropriate option for digital picture formats.

To avail the user define the sustainability of a digital format, the Library has created an online resource called the Sustainability of Digital Formats website. This web resource lists hundreds of digital formats and lays on a rubric to each in order to help the digital preservation professional determine if the format would be likely to be viable long term.